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Program Committee

2016 Program Committee:

Bernd GirodBernd Girod, Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor of Electrical Engineering; Senior Associate Dean at Large, Stanford University

Bernd Girod is the Robert L. and Audrey S. Hancock Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Until 1999, he was a Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. His research interests are in the area of image, video, and multimedia systems. He has published over 600 conference and journal papers and 6 books, receiving the EURASIP Signal Processing Best Paper Award in 2002, the IEEE Multimedia Communication Best Paper Award in 2007, the EURASIP Image Communication Best Paper Award in 2008, the EURASIP Signal Processing Most Cited Paper Award in 2008, as well as the EURASIP Technical Achievement Award in 2004 and the Technical Achievement Award of the IEEE Signal Processing Society in 2011. As an entrepreneur, Professor Girod has worked with numerous startup ventures, among them Polycom, Vivo Software, 8x8, and RealNetworks. He received an Engineering Doctorate from University of Hannover, Germany, and an M.S. Degree from Georgia Institute of Technology. Prof. Girod is a Fellow of the IEEE, a EURASIP Fellow, a member of the German National Academy of Sciences (Leopoldina), and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He currently serves Stanford’s School of Engineering as Senior Associate Dean at Large.

Marti HearstMarti Hearst, Professor, School of Information and EECS, University of California, Berkeley

Marti Hearst is a professor in the School of Information and the EECS Department at UC Berkeley. Her primary research interests are user interfaces for search engines, information visualization, natural language processing, and improving MOOCs. She wrote the first book on Search User Interfaces. Prof. Hearst was named a Fellow of the ACM in 2013 and has received an NSF CAREER award, an IBM Faculty Award, two Google Research Awards, an Okawa Foundation Fellowship, four Excellence in Teaching Awards, and has been principal investigator for more than $3.5M in research grants. Prof. Hearst has served on the Advisory Council of NSF's CISE Directorate and is currently on the Web Board for CACM, member of the Usage Panel for the American Heritage Dictionary, and on the Edge.org panel of experts. She is on the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction and was formerly on the boards of ACM Transactions on the Web, Computational Linguistics, ACM Transactions on Information Systems, and IEEE Intelligent Systems. Prof. Hearst received BA, MS, and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the University of California at Berkeley, and she was a Member of the Research Staff at Xerox PARC from 1994 to 1997.

Glynda HullGlynda Hull, Elizabeth H. and Eugene A. Shurtleff Chair in Undergraduate Education, University of California, Berkeley

Glynda Hull holds the Elizabeth H. and Eugene A. Shurtleff Chair in Undergraduate Education. A recipient of UC Berkeley’s Distinguished Teaching Award, Hull offers undergraduate, graduate, and teacher education courses on literacy and media, and her research focuses on improving K-12 education with a focus on literacy, language, and technology.Hull has published more than 100 articles, chapters, and books on topics ranging from the teaching of writing; digital technologies and their uses in schools; adult literacy and the changing contexts and requirements for work; and community, school, and university partnerships. This research has been supported by grants from the U.S. government and private foundations. Her books include Changing Work, Changing Workers: Critical Perspectives on Language, Literacy, and Skill; The New Work Order: Education and Literacy in the New Capitalism; and School’s Out! Bridging Out-of-School Literacies with Classroom Practice.In California, with support from the U.S. Department of Education and other agencies, Hull has created and studied after school programs for K-12 youth that emphasize digital media. Internationally, she has carried out research in India to study how schooling for girls might be transformed. She has recently worked with educators and researchers in several countries, including Norway, South Africa, and India to create and study an international social networking project for youth. Her current research focuses on designing innovative online spaces for learning and exploring the burgeoning phenomenon of global schools.

Robert LueRobert Lue, Faculty Director, HarvardX; Professor of the Practice of Molecular and Cellular Biology; Director of Life Sciences Education;Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, Harvard University

Robert Lue is a professor in the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology and the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning, where he is responsible for fostering innovative teaching in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) and elevating its profile on campus. Rob earned his Ph.D. in biology from Harvard and has taught undergraduate courses since 1988, garnering recognition as one of Harvard's foremost leaders in undergraduate education.Rob has a longstanding commitment to interdisciplinary teaching and research and serves as the director of Life Sciences Education at Harvard, where he led a complete redesign of the introductory curriculum that created some of the largest and most popular science courses on campus. As the faculty director of theHarvard-Allston Education Portal, Rob oversees the integration of undergraduate education with community outreach on Harvard’s Allston campus, and in 2012, Rob’s extensive work on using technology to enhance learning took a new direction when he became the faculty director of HarvardX. At HarvardX, Harvard’s university-wide initiative that includes the edX partnership in online education with MIT, Rob helps to shape the university’s engagement in online learning in a way that reinforces its commitment to teaching excellence and works to expand its reach and impact globally.

John MitchellJohn Mitchell, Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning; Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the School of Engineering; Professor of Computer Science and (by courtesy) Electrical Engineering and Education, Stanford University

John Mitchell is the Mary and Gordon Crary Family Professor in the Stanford School of Engineering, Professor of Computer Science, and Vice Provost for Online Learning. His research in computer security focuses on cloud security, mobile and web security, privacy, and network security. He has also worked on programming language analysis and design, formal methods, and applications of mathematical logic to computer science. Prof. Mitchell currently leads research projects funded by the US Air Force, the Office of Naval Research, and private companies and foundations; he is the Stanford Principal Investigator of the multidisciplinary TRUST NSF Science and Technology Center and Chief Computer Scientist of the DHHS-funded SHARPS project on healthcare security and privacy. He is a consultant and adviser to a companies and the author of over 150 research articles and two books.

Greg NiemeyerGreg Niemeyer, Associate Professor of Art Practice, University of California, Berkeley

Greg Niemeyer was born in Switzerland in 1967, and studied Classics and Photography. He started working with new media when he arrived in the Bay Area in 1992 and he received his MFA from Stanford University in New Media in 1997. At the same time, he founded the Stanford University Digital Art Center, which he directed until 2001, when he was appointed at UC Berkeley as Assistant Professor for New Media. At UC Berkeley, he is involved in the development of the Center for New Media, focusing on the critical analysis of the impact of new media on human experiences. His creative work focuses on the mediation between humans as individuals and humans as a collective through technological means, and emphasizes playful responses to technology. His most recognized projects are Gravity (Cooper Union, NYC, 1997), PING (SFMOMA, 2001), Oxygen Flute (SJMA, 2002), ar (Pacific Film Archive, 2003), Ping 2.0 (Paris, La Villette Numerique, 2004), Organum Playtest (2005), Good Morning Flowers (SFIFF 2006, Townhouse Gallery, Cairo, Egypt, 2006.)

Sanjay SarmaSanjay Sarma, Dean of Digital Learning, MIT

Sanjay Sarma leads the Office of Digital Learning, which oversees MIT OpenCourseWare and supports the development and use of digital technology for on-campus teaching and massive open online courses (MOOCs). He is also the Fred Fort Flowers (1941) and Daniel Fort Flowers (1941) Professor of Mechanical Engineering at MIT. A co-founder of the Auto-ID Center at MIT, Sarma developed many of the key technologies behind the EPC suite of RFID standards now used worldwide. He was the founder and CTO of OATSystems, which was acquired by Checkpoint Systems (NYSE: CKP) in 2008, and he has worked at Schlumberger Oilfield Services in Aberdeen, UK, and at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories in Berkeley, California. Currently, Sarma serves on the boards of GS1, EPCglobal, several startup companies including Senaya and ESSESS, and edX, the not-for-profit company set up by MIT and Harvard to create and promulgate an open-source platform for the distribution of free online education worldwide. He also advises several national governments and global companies. The author of more than 75 academic papers in computational geometry, sensing, RFID, automation, and CAD, Sarma is the recipient of numerous awards for teaching and research, including the MacVicar Fellowship, the Business Week eBiz Award, and InformationWeek's Innovators and Influencers Award. He received his bachelor’s degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, his master’s degree from Carnegie Mellon University, and his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Mitchell StevensMitchell Stevens, Associate Professor, Graduate School of Education; Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior in the Graduate School of Business (by courtesy); Director, Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research (SCANCOR), Stanford University

Michell Stevens is an Associate Professor of Education and (by courtesy) Organizational Behavior and Sociology at Stanford, where he also serves as Director of Digital Research and Planning. He studies the organization of US higher education, the quantification of academic performance, and alternative school forms. The author of prize-winning studies of home education and selective college admissions, he currently is writing a book about how US research universities organize research and teaching about the rest of the world. He serves as the third Director of the Scandinavian Consortium for Organizational Research, a cooperative institution that has brought more than 500 scholars to Stanford over a quarter century and catalyzes organizational scholarship worldwide.

Candace ThilleCandace Thille, Assistant Professor of Education, Stanford University

Candace Thille is an Assistant Professor of Education at Stanford’s Graduate School of Education and the founding director of the Open Learning Initiative at Carnegie Mellon University and at Stanford University. Her research focuses on applying results from the learning sciences to the design, implementation, and evaluation of open web-based learning environments.Dr. Thille serves on the board of directors of the Association of American Colleges and Universities; as a fellow of the International Society for Design and Development in Education; on the Assessment 2020 Task Force of the American Board of Internal Medicine; on the advisory council for the Association of American Universities STEM initiative; on the advisory council for the National Science Foundation Directorate for Education and Human Resources. She served on the working group of the President¹s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) that produced the Engage to Excel report and on the U.S. Department of Education working groups, co-authoring The 2010 and 2015 National Education Technology Plans.

Petra Dierkes-ThrunPetra Dierkes-Thrun, program committee, steering committee and conference operations coordinator

Petra Dierkes-Thrun's research and teaching interests include the European and transatlantic fin de siècle and modernism (including literature, the visual arts, opera, dance, and film); feminist and queer theory; LGBTQ literary and cultural studies; and digital pedagogy as well as literary theory for the digital age; pedagogically smart uses of technology in teaching, and project-based learning in the Humanities.Petra Dierkes-Thrun serves as an Advisory Editor for Gender and Sexuality Studies at boundary 2 (Duke University Press). She was the Founding Editor of The Latchkey: Journal of New Woman Studies, a peer-reviewed, international scholarly online journal dedicated to the figure of the New Woman in fin-de-siècle and modernist society and culture (Rivendale Press, UK).Petra is also the Director of Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning for the Office of the Vice Provost for Teaching and Learning.